McCormick Science Institute

MSI Funded Study: The Impact of Spices on Vegetable Consumption - A Pilot Study

Li, Z., Krak, M., Zerlin, A., Brahe, L. K., Rheinwald-Jones, A., Thames, G., Zhang, Y., Tseng, C.H., & Heber, D.

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MSI Team

March 2015-- Researchers at the UCLA School of Medicine conducted a study to evaluate the impact of spices added to broccoli, cauliflower, and spinach on amount and rate of vegetable consumption. Download the PDF.

Overview

This pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility of evaluating the impact of spices added to vegetables including broccoli, cauliflower, and spinach on amount and rate of vegetable consumption under controlled conditions using a Universal Eating Monitor (UEM). Pre- and post-consumption testing of taste, appetite and mood was assessed using a computer-based Visual Analog Scale (VAS).

Methods

Twenty overweight subjects who routinely ate less than three daily servings of vegetables were recruited. On six occasions, subjects were assigned in random order to eat broccoli, cauliflower, or spinach with or without added spices. Dishes were placed on a modified Universal Eating Monitor (UEM) that recorded rate of eating (g/sec), duration of eating (min) and total amount consumed (g).

Results/Conclusions

Total intake and duration of eating were increased significantly for broccoli with spices compared to plain broccoli, but there was no significant difference for cauliflower or spinach. No significant differences were noted in any of the visual analog scale (VAS) responses.

This study suggests that adding spices may increase vegetable intake, but more studies in greater numbers of subjects are needed.

Reference

Li, Z., Krak, M., Zerlin, A., Brahe, L. K., Rheinwald-Jones, A., Thames, G., ... & Heber, D. (2015). The Impact of Spices on Vegetable Consumption: A Pilot Study. Food and Nutrition Sciences, 6(04), 437. Download the PDF
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